Would you like to take more control over your pension fund investment decisions?

A Self Invested Personal Pension (SIPP) is a pension wrapper that is capable of holding a wide range of investments and providing you with the same tax advantages as other personal pension plans.

 

Expert professional advice

However, they are more complex than conventional products and it is essential you seek expert professional advice. SIPPs allow investors to choose their own investments or appoint an investment manager to look after the portfolio on their behalf. Individuals have to appoint a trustee to oversee the operation of the SIPP but, having done that, the individual can effectively run the pension fund on his or her own.

A fully fledged SIPP can accommodate a wide range of investments under its umbrella, including shares, bonds, cash, commercial property, hedge funds and private equity.

More control

You can choose from a number of different investments, unlike other traditional pension schemes, which may give you more control over where your money is invested. Once invested in your pension, the funds grow free of UK capital gains tax and income tax (tax deducted from dividends cannot be reclaimed).

Tax benefits

There are significant tax benefits. The government contributes 20 per cent of every gross contribution you pay – meaning that a £1,000 investment in your SIPP costs you just £800. If you are a higher or additional rate taxpayer, the tax benefits could be even greater. In the above example, higher rate (40 per cent) taxpayers could claim back as much as a further £200 via their tax return. Additional rate (50 per cent) taxpayers could claim back as much as a further £300.

Carry forward

There is an annual maximum tax-relievable contribution level of £50,000 for 2012/13. You could contribute more, but would be taxed at your marginal rate. Commencing from the start of the 2011/12 tax year, it is now possible to carry forward any unused allowance from the previous three tax years (for this purpose the maximum allowance is £50,000 per tax year). We would strongly recommend that you obtain professional financial advice if you would like to utilise this option.

Pensionable income, including employment income, bonus, benefits in kind, self employment and partnership profits, can all potentially be contributed. Pensionable income does not include investment income, rental income or pension income however.

Other considerations

You cannot draw on a SIPP pension before age 55 and you should be mindful of the fact that you’ll need to spend time managing your investments. Where investment is made in commercial property, you may have periods without rental income and, in some cases, the pension fund may need to sell property when the market is not at its strongest.

Because there may be many transactions moving investments around, the administrative costs are often higher than those of a normal pension fund. The tax benefits and governing rules of SIPPs may change in the future. The level of pension benefits payable cannot be guaranteed as they will depend on interest rates when you start taking your benefits.

The value of your SIPP may be less than you expected if you stop or reduce contributions, or if you take your pension earlier than you had planned.

A pension is a long-term investment. The fund value may fluctuate and can go down as well as up. You may not get back your original investment. Past performance is not an indication of future performance. Tax benefits may vary as a result of statutory change and their value will depend on individual circumstances. Thresholds, percentage rates and tax legislation may change in subsequent Finance Acts.